Home Construction Improvement http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com Expert Home Improvement Advice Thu, 19 Feb 2015 05:08:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1.1 Get Woodworking 2015: Boot Jackhttp://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/get-woodworking-2015-boot-jack/ http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/get-woodworking-2015-boot-jack/#comments Thu, 19 Feb 2015 05:02:40 +0000 http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/?p=12293 Get Woodworking 2015: Boot Jack Have you ever wanted to get into woodworking but weren’t sure where to start? There is a great event in the woodworking community that happens every year and it’s geared towards people like you, the brand new woodworker. It’s called Get Woodworking Week and every year more and more articles and…

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Get Woodworking 2015: Boot Jack

Have you ever wanted to get into woodworking but weren’t sure where to start? There is a great event in the woodworking community that happens every year and it’s geared towards people like you, the brand new woodworker. It’s called Get Woodworking Week and every year more and more articles and projects are put together as a way to encourage and teach people woodworking skills. I’ve always been a lurker but this year decided to write up a quick how-to on an easy starter project. The project is a very simple boot jack. A boot jack is used to help you take off your boots without mucking up your socks. The boot jack uses a consumer level jig saw as the only power tool. Let’s get started.Boot Jack-14

GWW15

About Jigsaws

Jigsaws are a power tool that uses reciprocating action of the blade and cuts on the up stroke. This pulls the workpiece up against the shoe of the saw but can also cause tear-out (splintering) on the face that is facing up. For this reason be sure mark and cut with the less desirable face of the board facing up. Some saws come with orbital action which moves the blade forward while it is on the up stroke. This helps the saw to cut faster. For this project the speed of the cut is less important then the quality. Dial down the orbital action to help minimize tear out.

Gather your tools and supplies

Boot Jack-1

This project uses only one power tool, a jigsaw, and a minimum of other tools. If you don’t own a jig saw, a $30-$50 consumer model would work just fine for this. I’m using RYOBI’s variable speed orbital jigsaw but almost any saw in this category will work fine. Other tools needed are a pencil, ruler (at least 12″), clamp, wood glue, safety glasses, sandpaper, and a cup of coffee. We are starting with an 18″ piece of 1×6. I’m using standard construction grade pine but oak, maple, or just about anything else will work fine. If you buy your board at the big box stores I think the minimum size you can get in 1×6 is 3′ long. They will be happy to cut that board in half for you right in the store so you can have two 18″ boards. Make a boot jack for a friend if you like!

Mark the straight cuts

The boot jack’s finished length will be right around 16″ but we start with an 18″ board so that 2″ can be buzzed off an end right away to be used later as a foot to hold the business end in the air. Take your ruler and mark 2″ from the end of the board along parallel edges and connect the marks to form a straight line. Clamp down your board and cut off the 2″ piece and set aside.

 

Boot Jack-2

Next measure in 1″ from the sides of the board along one end. Then go to the opposite end of theBoot Jack-3_2 board and measure down 4″ on each side. Connect the 4″ tick mark to the 1″ mark along the perpendicular face. This forms two long slim triangles. Cut these triangles off. While this step isn’t necessary for the function of the boot jack, it just gives it a subtle style.

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WoodTrac Ceiling System Reviewhttp://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/woodtrac-ceiling-system-review/ http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/woodtrac-ceiling-system-review/#comments Sun, 01 Feb 2015 16:27:06 +0000 http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/?p=12231 WoodTrac Ceiling System I’m a huge proponent of using suspended ceilings (drop ceilings, acoustic tile ceilings) for finished basements because they allow easy access to electrical, plumbing and heating utilities that are typically suspended from the floor framing above.  Lots of my customers cringe when I make this suggestion because they don’t like the appearance…

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WoodTrac Ceiling System

I’m a huge proponent of using suspended ceilings (drop ceilings, acoustic tile ceilings) for finished basements because they allow easy access to electrical, plumbing and heating utilities that are typically suspended from the floor framing above.  Lots of my customers cringe when I make this suggestion because they don’t like the appearance of standard ceiling tiles regardless of the pattern and texture that I suggest. So I was very excited to try a new product called WoodTrac Ceiling System on a recent basement office project.

WoodTrac Ceiling Basement Office

How WoodTrac Ceiling Systems Works

The WoodTrac Ceiling System works in conjunction with standard suspended ceiling grids or you can install it directly to a fixed ceiling (I’m only going to cover the suspended system in this article). Whether you’re looking to renovate an existing suspended ceiling or you’re installing a new ceiling, you’ll need the aluminum grid. This system will work with grids that are 9/16″, 15/16″ and 1″ wide by simply using different attachment clips. The WoodTrac System includes the following materials:

  • 24″x24″ Wood Panels – These wood panels sit on top of the grid instead of traditional acoustic tiles.
  • Wall Moldings – These moldings clip to the suspended ceiling edge angle supports. The wall moldings come in 4′ or 12′ lengths and several edge profiles.
  • Main Runners – The main runners come in 4′ and 12′ lengths and snap onto the bottom of the suspended ceiling main runners with simple clips.
  • Cross Tees – The cross tees come in 2′ lengths and clip onto the bottom of the suspended ceiling cross tees with the same clips.
  • Light Kits – If you use “troffer” style lights you can order a light kit, either 2’x2′ or 2’x4′, which trims out these type of light fixtures nicely.

Not included with the WoodTrac system is any of the aluminum suspended grid or lighting. You can learn more about all the products they offer by visiting this page or using their project calculator.

Suspended Ceiling Grid

Installing WoodTrac Ceiling Systems (Suspended Version)

Installing the WoodTrac system is fairly straight forward and it’s certainly a project that any contractor and people with moderate DIY skills can handle. In this article I’m going to assume that the aluminum suspended ceiling grid is already installed. We’ll try to put together a separate article on installing the grid as it’s another great topic. You’ll need some basic tools for this project including:

  • Tape Measure
  • Miter Saw – You can use any power miter saw or even a hand saw with a simple miter box.
  • Table Saw – A table saw works great to cut down the edge panels. However, you could use a circular saw, jig saw, and possibly even a handsaw.

Step 1 – Installing the Wall Moldings

The first step in installing the WoodTrac system is installing the wall molding along the perimeter of the room. The wall molding uses a simple metal clip to hang the molding from the wall angle of the suspended ceiling grid. The wall clips are first snapped into the back of the wall molding (clips are installed every few feet), then the wall molding is slid up along the wall so the clips slide behind the wall angle until the molding is tight to the bottom of the wall angle. Then the clip is bent over the top of the wall angle which holds the molding securely in place.

WoodTrac Wall Molding Installation

You’ll need the miter saw to cut the moldings to length. For corners of the room you’ll want to cut the ends at a miter for a finished look. Also, on long wall runs greater than 12′ you’ll want to use a scarf joint.

WoodTrac Wall Molding Clip Folded Over

Step 2 – Installing the Main Runner Moldings

The next step is installing the main runner moldings to the bottom of the main grid runners. Measure the length of the runner from the face of the wall molding to the face of the adjacent wall molding and cut the runner to length using a miter saw. Snap molding clips to the bottom of the aluminum grid every few feet (exact spacing is listed in the manufacturers installation guide). Finally lift the main runner molding up and snap it into the clips which hold it securely to the bottom of the aluminum runner. For long lengths it’s helpful to have an extra person help hold up the molding.

WoodTrac Molding Clip

Step 3 – Installing the Cross Tee Moldings

Once all the main runner moldings are installed the next step is installing the cross tee moldings. These moldings are all shipped the proper length so they do not need to be cut for any of the standard 2’x2′ grid lines. You will have to cut the cross tees for the border tile areas that are less than 2′. Just like the main runners, molding clips are snapped onto the bottom of the aluminum cross tees at each end, then the cross tee molding is simply snapped into place.

WoodTrac Molding and Clip

WoodTrac Installing Moldings

Step 4 – Installing the Wood Panels

The final step involves installing the wood panels. If your ceiling will use recessed lights it’s important to install those tiles first. I recommend buying a hole saw that’s specifically sized for recessed light fixtures (trust me, it’s worth the price and will save you a ton of time!). After the hole is cut for the light fixture, install the tile so that it sits on top of the grid. Then drop the light fixture into the hole from above the grid. Then continue installing all the full size 2’x2′ wood panels in the remaining spaces.

WoodTrac Ceiling Installing Panels

After all the full panels are installed you’ll need to cut the edge panels to size. Make sure to measure the panels so they are larger than the finished opening, so the grid can support the panel. I recommend using a table saw to cut the panels so the cuts are straight and less likely to chip/splinter on the edges.

Overall Impression of WoodTrac Ceiling System

The WoodTrac Ceiling System is a great alternative to traditional acoustic ceiling systems. For this project I was able to install the entire ceiling of a 12’x12′ room in just over an hour. I did have a helper for a portion of that time but I was very impressed with the ease of installation. Ordering and delivery of the materials was very easy and all the materials showed up un-damaged and in great condition.

I’m very happy with the look of this ceiling system. It adds a very nice “richness” to the room and a very different look than more traditional ceiling tile systems. It’s important to note that the materials are not “real” wood. WoodTrac panels and moldings are MDF (medium density fiberboard) wrapped with a paper laminate. Having said that, the product looks great in my opinion and is certainly a fraction of the cost if you were to try and building something like this from real wood and even then you wouldn’t have the access that this system allows (access to mechanicals).

WoodTrac Ceiling Basement Office

The WoodTrac system for this project was about $4 per sq. ft. (materials only)and that price does not include the grid. The grid materials for this project cost about $0.50 per sq. ft. A traditional suspended ceiling typically runs about $1 per sq. ft. for materials (that includes the tiles).  While the WoodTrac product is about 3 times more money than a traditional suspended ceiling it does offer a very nice upgrade that’s MUCH cheaper than a custom wood ceiling that would likely cost $15-$25 per sq. ft.

For home owners looking for an alternative to traditional suspended ceiling system WoodTrac is an excellent option.

 

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Walk-Out Basement Wall Insulationhttp://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/walk-basement-wall-insulation/ http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/walk-basement-wall-insulation/#comments Thu, 15 Jan 2015 00:00:54 +0000 http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/?p=12249 Insulating Wood Framed Walk-Out Basement Walls Walk-Out foundations create an interesting dilemma in when considering wall insulating details. I’ve written extensively on the subject of how to properly insulate basement walls which deals with concrete (and block) walls but I’ve never addressed the occasional wood framed walk-out walls that exist in some many homes today.…

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Insulating Wood Framed Walk-Out Basement Walls

Walk-Out foundations create an interesting dilemma in when considering wall insulating details. I’ve written extensively on the subject of how to properly insulate basement walls which deals with concrete (and block) walls but I’ve never addressed the occasional wood framed walk-out walls that exist in some many homes today. In this article I want to discuss the options most suitable for insulating these wood framed exterior walls that exist in homes with walk-out basements.

Basement Insulation Banner

Typical Wood Framed Walk-Out Basement Walls

Typically we see most wood framed walk-out basement exterior walls insulated with fiberglass insulation and some type of vapor barrier. This detail is used in millions of homes in the exterior walls above grade with some success (the industry is slowly moving away from this detail, but it’s still the most widely used today). So if this detail works ok above grade, why might it not be the most suitable solution in a basement? The answer really revolves around the high humidity levels that typically exist in a basement regardless if there’s a walk-out wall or some other means of egress like a bulkhead.

Many times when we remove fiberglass insulation from a wood framed basement wall we find signs of mold and moisture. In most situations we find frost (during the winter) building up behind the fiberglass, on the surface of the exterior sheathing, around nails (from siding and framing). Moisture from the basement penetrates the wall system, hits the back side of the sheathing and exposed fasteners and condenses and forms frost on cold days. This cycle goes back and forth through the seasons and helps promote mold and mildew growth.

Improved Wood Framed Walk-Out Basement Wall Insulation Details

If you’re going to take the time and money to properly insulate the rest of the conventional foundation walls it’s definitely worth spending a bit more money and time on the framed walk-out walls as well. There are several options to consider including:

  • Spray Foam – One of the best options is to have the framed walk-out walls spray foamed with closed cell foam. The spray foam will not only provide the highest R value but it will also create the tightest wall system preventing air infiltration and moisture movement. This option is the most expensive and also requires a professional installation in most cases.
  • Flash & Batt (Spray Foam & Fiberglass Combination) – A process that’s getting lots of attention and I’m seeing more on job sites is called “Flash & Batt”. In this detail the stud bays are “flashed” with spray foam, typically about 2″ of closed cell foam which creates both a good starting layer of insulation value (higher R value per inch than fiberglass) and it seals the wall against air infiltration which drastically improves the efficiency of fiberglass insulation (fiberglass significantly loses R value when air infiltrates the wall section). This option is more cost effective than the one above but typically involves a spray foam contractor plus yourself or additional labor for the fiberglass.
  • Foam Board & Fiberglass – Another option is to use a combination of closed cell foam board (XPS Foam Board or Polyiso Foam Board) and fiberglass insulation. This detail is a great option for DIY’ers and general contractors that don’t want to involve a specialized contractor like spray foam applicators. In this approach a layer of XPS or Polyiso foam board are cut to fit in the stud cavity tight against the exterior sheathing. Then the foam is sealed to the framing using canned spray foam. This effectively seals the stud bay from air infiltration and vapor transmission. In order for this to work effectively the foam board should be a minimum of 1-1/2″ thick (2″ preferably). Finally the stud bay can be filled with unfaced fiberglass insulation. It’s VERY important not to install a vapor barrier over the fiberglass as this would create a double barrier trapping any moisture between the insulation and vapor barrier.

Walk-out Basement Wall Insulated with DOW Foam Board

Example Basement Walk-Out Framed Wall Insulated with Foam Board and Fiberglass Insulation

In the picture above you can see a fairly typical walk-out basement wall. The wall has two features that are fairly common, on the left side of the photo is a portion of the concrete foundation wall that sits about 4′ above the slab due to the changing grade along the side of the house. On top of the wall is a wood framed wall which transitions to a full height completely wood framed wall at the rear of the house. For this walk-out wall there are several details to consider:

  • The exposed concrete foundation wall (above left, and lower) is covered in closed cell foam insulation board. The next step will be to frame a short wall in front of it (it will have a decorative cap on it after, instead of framing the new wall all the way to the ceiling). In this case the lower portion of the wall is insulated exactly as I’ve discussed in my Basement Insulation Article.
  • Each stud bay was insulated first with 2″ of DOW XPS foam board. The pieces were cut so they fit easily into the bay. Then a can of spray foam was used to seal the foam board to the framing. It’s best to do the spray foam last after all the foam is fit so you can use an entire can before it clogs up.

DOW Foam Board Sealed in Stud Bay Cavity with Spray Foam

  • Lastly, the remaining stud bay is filled with unfaced fiberglass insulation. It’s extremely important that a vapor barrier is NOT installed over the fiberglass with this detail. It will trap moisture in the stud bay leading to serious problems.

Basement Walk-Out Framed Wall Insulated with DOW Foam Board and Fiberglass Insulation

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Outdoor Timber Pavilion by Western Timber Framehttp://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/outdoor-timber-pavilion-by-western-timber-frame/ http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/outdoor-timber-pavilion-by-western-timber-frame/#comments Sun, 21 Dec 2014 17:02:21 +0000 http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/?p=12204 Timber Frame Pavilion Project Editors Note: We installed this pavilion in the late Fall here in NH and the weather turned before we could get some nice finished photos. We’ll update this article early next year when the weather clears and the final touches are complete on the landscaping. In the meantime we wanted to…

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Timber Frame Pavilion Project

Editors Note: We installed this pavilion in the late Fall here in NH and the weather turned before we could get some nice finished photos. We’ll update this article early next year when the weather clears and the final touches are complete on the landscaping. In the meantime we wanted to share this exciting project.

Outdoor living spaces have become one of the most popular landscaping projects for home owners looking to expand their yards and gain useful spaces to entertain and relax. Last Spring we started an extensive year long outdoor living project including a custom patio with built-in fire pit, retaining wall, outdoor pavilion, and an in-ground swimming pool. The outdoor pavilion is a focal point and a key feature that anchors the seating area to the pool patio. In this article we’ll share our experience in ordering and installing a pavilion kit from Western Timber Frame out in Utah.

Timber Pavilion by Wester Timber Frame

Building A Pavilion – Lots of Options

Anyone looking to build a pavilion in their backyard will quickly realize there are tons of options out there from building it yourself from scratch to hiring a general contractor for a totally custom structure. You can also hire an architect to design anything from a simple structure to the Taj Mahal of pavilions that would make structures at Disney proud. For this project I evaluated several options including:

  • Custom Design / Site Build: I designed a pavilion very similar to the one shown above. I used the 3D drafting program SketchUp to design the pavilion and create a material list. My plan was to build the pavilion from Cedar timbers using steel connection plates and structural fasteners.
  • Traditional Timber Frame: In this scenario I was going to have a local timber frame manufacturer cut a traditional mortise and tenon timber frame from Douglas Fir based on my 3D model mentioned above.
  • Timber Frame Kit: Ultimately I ended up purchasing a kit from Western Timber Frame. There are several companies advertising online for pavilion and gazebo kits that you can install yourself or hire a contractor to erect for you. We chose Western Timber Frame for several reasons including the quality of the frame (they use beautiful Douglas Fir just like a regular timber frame manufacturer would), their unique frame connections, and their excellent customer service that made the entire process very smooth.

Pavilion Model

One of the big reasons I went with the kit (and also why I was leaning towards a pre-cut frame) was time. My schedule is so hectic that it wasn’t realistic for me to spend the time necessary to build the structure from scratch. Boy am I glad I made the choice I made, we got this pavilion up just in time to beat old man winter!

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Drywall | Snap, Crackle, Pophttp://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/drywall-snap-crackle-pop/ http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/drywall-snap-crackle-pop/#comments Wed, 03 Dec 2014 09:12:58 +0000 http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/?p=2289 Minor Drywall Problems At work we warranty certain things on new homes for one year. By far the most common problem we see after a year are minor drywall problems. It’s not unusual at all during the first year or so of a new home to see and hear lots of minor drywall problems. In…

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Minor Drywall Problems

At work we warranty certain things on new homes for one year. By far the most common problem we see after a year are minor drywall problems. It’s not unusual at all during the first year or so of a new home to see and hear lots of minor drywall problems. In fact, I liken it to the “Snap, Crackle and Pop” theme from Rice Crispies!

As your new home dries out (framing lumber is always full of excess moisture) the framing members will shrink every so slightly causing stress and movement on drywall joints. The stresses are sufficient to cause some small cracks and “nail pops” at some of the screws. This is completely normal and expected with all new home construction. In fact, it’s so common that most house warranty programs only cover major cracks which are more likely related to structural performance.

Drywall Nail PopDrywall Nail Pops

Drywall nail pops (or screw pops more likely) are by far the most common drywall problem or defect. I challenge you to find me a newly built home that doesn’t have quite a few of these nail pops after a year or so after construction is complete. Nail pops are going to happen and there’s nothing you can do to prevent them.

Fortunately they are very easy to fix and not likely to reoccur after they’ve been fixed. As you can see in the photo this nail pop has actually caused the joint compound to crack and fall away from the screw head. Sometimes the screw or nail head doesn’t pop through completely but you can still see the round head bulging out.

To fix a nail (screw) pop you’ll want to use a putty knife to scrape off the excess joint compound that’s creating the bulge. Once you’ve removed the bulging joint compound then check to be sure the screw is tight. I recommend you use a hand screw driver for this and NOT a screw gun. Once the screw is tight then apply new joint compound to the screw head hole. This may take two coats to completely cover the hole. Then just sand it smooth, prime and paint. If you don’t prime it first the paint has NO chance of matching.

Drywall Crack Under WindowHairline Drywall Cracks

Another common drywall problem or defect are hairline cracks. In the photo you can see a hairline vertical crack in the drywall just below the window sill. This is one of the most common locations for hairline cracks to form (above the window is very common as well). Thermal stresses on the house are much higher at door and window openings for many reasons and this can cause hairline cracking of the drywall.

Just like the nail pops these hairline cracks are most likely to occur in the first year or so of the houses life. However, this is not something to lose sleep over and it’s extremely common in new construction. Again this is a very easy repair and one that any DIY veteran can handle.

Steps to repair hairline drywall cracks:

  1. Gouge out the crack with a utility knife to create a “V” groove, this makes room for additional joint compound. Be sure to clean out the groove and crack really well.
  2. Apply a layer of joint compound. Make sure to apply the mud 2 to 3 inches on either side of the crack.
  3. Apply a layer of paper or fiberglass joint tape.
  4. Use a wide putty knife (6″ minimum) to apply a 2nd layer of joint compound over the joint tape. Be sure to spread the joint compound on smooth and wife off any excess material. Let the joint compound dry.
  5. Apply another thin layer of joint compound over the tape and previous skim coat.
  6. Sand the patch smooth.
  7. Prime and paint.

Don’t Sweat the Drywall Problems

I hope you read this article and realize your house is not special. I hope you realize that drywall will “Snap, Crackle and Pop” and it’s perfectly normal. I also want you to realize that fixing those minor nail pops and cracks are easy to do and something that anyone with minimal DIY experience can handle. If you’re planning on painting a room anytime soon then that’s the best time to tackle these small repairs.

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Kohler Introduces Smaller-Sized Generator Unitshttp://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/kohler-introduces-smaller-sized-generator-units/ http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/kohler-introduces-smaller-sized-generator-units/#comments Tue, 14 Oct 2014 18:14:38 +0000 http://www.homeconstructionimprovement.com/?p=12185 8, 10 and 12 kW Generators Make Standby Power More Accessible KOHLER, Wis. – September 23, 2014 – Kohler® Generators is rolling out a complete new line of standby generators designed for homeowners with fewer power requirements, and who are looking for the performance and reliability of a KOHLER unit at an entry-level price point.…

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8, 10 and 12 kW Generators Make Standby Power More Accessible

KOHLER, Wis. – September 23, 2014 – Kohler® Generators is rolling out a complete new line of standby generators designed for homeowners with fewer power requirements, and who are looking for the performance and reliability of a KOHLER unit at an entry-level price point. The expanded line focuses on lower kW-output models – 8 kW, 10 kW and 12 kW – making standby power available to more consumers with smaller budgets.

“All homeowners should have access to safe, reliable backup power – no matter their budgets,” said Thomas Landrum, director of marketing, residential/light commercial for Kohler Generators. “These new units deliver Kohler quality and performance and address the needs of more homeowners.”

8-10-12 kWThe 8 kW, 10 kW and 12 kW standby units (8 RESV/*RESVL, 10 RESV/10 RESVL, 12 RESV/12 RESVL) may be price positioned at the lower end of the KOHLER home standby offering, but they provide the same performance, reliability and craftsmanship consumers have come to expect from Kohler. Each unit delivers high-quality power by offering advanced voltage and frequency regulation along with ultra-low levels of harmonic distortion. This results in excellent power quality to protect delicate electronics and expensive appliances. In addition, Kohler’s exclusive Powerboost technology provides advanced startup power to handle heavy loads like a central air conditioning unit and can power up in as little as 10 seconds. Other standout features of the 8 kW, 10kW and 12 kW models include:

  • Units run on liquid propane (LP) or natural gas
  • They offer quiet, “neighborhood-friendly” operation
  • The units require a smaller installation footprint because they are roughly half the size of their larger kW counterparts
  • The generators feature a new enclosure made from steel, dipped in e-coat for extra corrosion protection and painted with a durable powder coat finish in KOHLER cashmere to blend into any backyard setting
  • They offer remote monitoring capabilities via smartphone, tablet or computer as standard
  • All “L” models come with a new 100 Amp RXT Automatic Transfer Switch
  • All models come with a five-year or 2,000-hour limited warranty

“Kohler is committed to best-in-class performance and reliability at every price point,” Landrum said. “Our smaller standby units fulfill the growing demand for more entry-level standby generators without sacrificing anything when it comes to performance and dependability.”

Kohler’s new line of standby generators are designed for homeowners who wish to power a few essential systems or appliances in their home during a power outage. They can power multiple circuits in a home that connect to items like a refrigerator, sump pump, HVAC system, lighting and more. When power is lost to the home, a KOHLER standby generator automatically turns on – generally within 10 seconds – and runs on propane or natural gas. Homeowners do not need to be present to start or refuel the generator.

For more information about Kohler’s 8 kW, 10 kW and 12 kW standby generators, visit KohlerGenerators.com or call 800-544-2444.

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