Rockwell Jawstand

By Todd Fratzel on Hand Tools

NEW ROCKWELL JAWSTAND

A SECOND SET OF HANDS AT YOUR SERVICE

Anyone that reads this site on a regular basis knows that I’m a huge fan of the Rockwell Jawhorse. I use my Jawhorse in the shop constantly as my second set of hands when I’m working alone. So when I saw this press release today I had to share! Read one to learn more.

Charlotte, N.C. — So, how many times have you been in the middle of a project and wished you had another set of hands? The new Rockwell® JawStand™ provides just that and more. This compact easy-to-use work stand not only supports loads up to 220 lbs, but it can clamp work pieces up to 1-3/4 in. thick and raise them 41 in. off the ground. Another nice feature of this heavy-duty tripod based support is its ability to pivot 0 to 90°, and swivel 360°.

The JawStand works great as an extension table or outfeed support when cutting sheet goods. Or if you’re using a miter saw to cut long pieces of molding for instance, it makes a perfect work support stand. It also holds doors during installation; raises bath or utility cabinets for mounting; clamps work pieces for sanding, painting, polishing, scraping or staining; and more. Not only is it handy on the jobsite, but It’s ideal for do-it-yourselfers and crafts enthusiasts.

This workbench accessory comes fully assembled and sets up without tools in less than 20 seconds. Weighing only 13.2 lbs., the JawStand stores easily whether it’s in a pickup truck bed making jobsite runs, trunk of a car or corner in the garage.

Constructed of hardened steel, the JawStand has a sturdy tripod base with non-marring and non-slip rubber feet. The tripod base provides excellent stability on level and uneven surfaces.

The height of the support surface is adjustable from 25 in. to 41 in. Simply loosen the locking knob and move the column up and down. A distinct scale on the support column indicates the working height of the stand. Atop the stand are two low-friction slides. These slides allow material to pass over them freely, and unlike rollers, the slides keep the workpiece from drifting. The slides also feature a built in bubble level. Use it to make sure the support surface is perfectly level, even if the ground below is not.

A clamp is built into the support table which has a coated rubber surface on the face. Its jaws have a maximum clamping range of 0 to 1-3/4 in. The clamping head swivels 360° and tilts 90° to handle a variety of work applications.

The Rockwell® JawStand (#RK9033, $69.99) is available at rockwelltoolsdirect.com and other online Websites, including sears.com at this link: Rockwell Jawstand. It also is expected to be available through various local retailers such as Woodcraft Supply and independent hardware stores, home centers and lumber yards.

About the author

Todd Fratzel

I'm full time builder for a large construction company in New Hampshire. I run their design-build division that specializes in custom homes, commercial design-build projects and sub-divisions. I'm also a licensed civil and structural engineer with extensive experience in civil and structural design and home construction. My hope is that I can share my experience in the home construction, home improvement and home renovation profession with other builders and home owners. I'm also the Editor-in-Chief and Founder of Tool Box Buzz. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions, suggestions or you'd like to inquire about advertising on this site.

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2 Comments

  1. jay says:

    do you think the jawstand is better than the jawhorse (same company). For the price difference the jawhorse would have to be WAY better….

    • Todd says:

      Jay – They really are two different tools. I have a Jawhorse and it’s great in the shop. I use it for all kinds of projects in the same capacity that I would use a bench vice. The Jawstand is definitely more applicable to doors, cabinets, things of that nature. Honestly I think they both have different unique uses.

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